These are the Only Malaria-free Countries in Africa – 2020

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Malaria is one of the leading killers in Africa with an estimated 200 million cases, and 94% of global deaths.

These are the Only Malaria-free Countries in Africa

With over 200 million sick people and 405,000 deaths in 2018, malaria remains the most deadly parasite and mostly affects children under five and pregnant women in Africa.

The infectious disease is caused by a parasite of the genus Plasmodium, propagated by the bite of certain species of anopheline mosquitoes.

Although, 93% of cases and 94% of malaria deaths worldwide are recorded in Africa, there are still some African countries that are free from the deadly parasite; some because Malaria never existed or disappeared without specific measures while others made concerted efforts to eliminate malaria.

To be certified Malaria-free by WHO, a country must be Malaria-free for three consecutive years

That said, these are the Only Malaria-free Countries in Africa.

1. Algeria

Certified Malaria-free: 2019

These are the Only Malaria-free Countries in Africa

Algeria was the country where the Malaria parasite was first discovered in humans about a century and a half ago. Since then the country has shown tenacity in tackling the disease.

The country experienced her toughest period of battling the disease in the 1960s where up to 80,000 cases were being reported each year.

Algeria made concerted efforts to eliminate malaria. Some of the measures they used in defeating malaria as stated by WHO are:
Provision of free malaria diagnosis and treatment, Investment in Universal Health Care, Well-trained health care personnel, Quick response to disease outbreaks, Improved surveillance.

The country was certified Malaria-free free in 2019.

2. Lesotho

Certified Malaria-free: 2012

Lesotho is among the Only Malaria-free Countries in Africa

Transmission of malaria reportedly does not occur in Lesotho. The country was listed in the “Malaria never existed or disappear without specific measures” category.

3. Mauritius

Certified Malaria-free: 1973

Mauritius is the first certified Malaria-free Country in Africa

Mauritius is the first country in the WHO African Region to be officially recognized as malaria-free.

Malaria remained the principal cause of death until 1949, when the Malaria Eradication Programme started. In the 1930’s and 1940’s malaria accounted for 26% of the total mortality, in 1947 it was 71%, 52% in 1949 and 44% in 1950.

In 1949 the government began a spraying campaign of all houses with DDT. The spraying led to the eradication of Anopheles Funestus by 1959, thus reducing malaria prevalence to a very low level. The number of malaria cases dropped from 48,000 in 1948 to 6000 in 1950. During the same period, total mortality and infant mortality fell dramatically.

The country was certified malaria free in 1973.

4. Seychelles

Certified Malaria-free: 2012

 Malaria-free Countries in Africa

Anopheles mosquitoes, which transmit the malaria parasite by their bite are present almost throughout the world. Only five areas are exceptions: Antarctic and Iceland, New-Caledonia, the Central Pacific islands, and the Seychelles. New research suggests that the Seychelles have been spared because anopheles mosquitoes require the blood of terrestrial mammals which, apart from bats, are lacking.

The country was Certified Malaria-free in 2012.

5. Morocco

Certified Malaria-free: 2010

Morocco is among the Only Malaria-free Countries in Africa

The history of malaria control in Morocco dates back to the early 1920s. The recorded annual incidence of malaria peaked in 1939 at 350,000 cases and remained high throughout the 1940s, with 303,000 reported cases and 548 recorded malaria deaths in 1947.

Since then, the burden of the disease has declined steadily thanks to a combination of control interventions, improved health service coverage and economic development.

In 2008, after 4 years without local transmission, procedures towards certification of the achievement of malaria elimination were launched. After following WHO standard operating procedures that include intensive external evaluation, Morocco was certified Malaria-free in May 2010.

6. Tunisia

Certified Malaria-free: 2012

 Malaria-free Countries in Africa

Transmission of malaria reportedly does not occur in Tunisia. The country was listed in the “Malaria never existed or disappear without specific measures” category.

7. Libya

Certified Malaria-free: 2012

These are the Only Malaria-free Countries in Africa

Transmission of malaria reportedly does not occur in Libya. The country was listed in the “Malaria never existed or disappear without specific measures” category.


One of the goals of the World Health Organization ‘s 2016 – 2030 programme against malaria is to wipe out the disease in at least 10 countries by the end of this decade.

“WHO estimates that 21 countries are in a position to achieve this goal, including six countries in the African Region, where the burden of the disease is heaviest, “the Geneva- based organisation said in a statement.

In South Africa the elimination of malaria is a public health objective. The country registered 11,700 cases of the disease in 2014 – – down from 64 , 000 in 2000 with most diagnoses coming from areas bordering Swaziland, Zimbabwe and Mozambique.

“Through targeted action and cross-border collaboration, South Africa has the potential to eliminate malaria by 2020, ” the WHO report said.

The other countries the organisation believes could achieve this objective are Algeria (already achieved it), Botswana , Cape Verde, Comoros, South Africa and Swaziland.



Uzonna Anele
Anele is a web developer and a Pan-Africanist who believes bad leadership is the only thing keeping Africa from taking its rightful place in the modern world.

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