Eating Too Much salt Puts Your Liver at Risk: Study Finds

Must Read

Apart from the obvious fact that a little salt can bring out the flavor of just about any dish.

Excessive salt us bad for the liver
Image source; Nairaland

Salt, Among other functions, also helps the sodium ions that helps regulate water movement within the body and conduct nerve impulses.

But too much of it can be damning, as in addition to high blood pressure, overconsumption of sodium can also damage the liver.

According to ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

The human body needs a small amount of salt — one teaspoon per day if you are a healthy adult.

Scientists in the United States report a new animal study that found a high-salt diet might also contribute to liver damage in adults and developing embryos.

The researchers gave adult mice a high-salt diet and exposed chick embryos to a high salt intake and it was discoered that excessive salt was associated with a number of changes in the animals’ livers, including oddly shaped cells, an increase in cell death and a decrease in cell proliferation, which can contribute to the development of fibrosis.

Although researchers did also find that treating damaged cells with vitamin C appeared to partially counter the ill effects of excess salt. Prevention is by far better than cure.

So if you are guilty of consuming excessive salt, Its high time you stopped it before it becomes too late.

uzoclinton92@gmail.com'
Uzonna Anele
Anele is a web developer and a Pan-Africanist who believes bad leadership is the only thing keeping Africa from taking its rightful place in the modern world.

Leave a Reply

Subscribe to receive email updates

With a subscription profile, you automatically receive updates without having to return to the website and check for changes

Just In

Phillis Wheatley: the First Black Woman to Publish a Book

After being snatched from her parents home in West Africa and sold into slavery in Boston, Phillis Wheatley became the first African American to publish a book of poetry in 1773.

More Articles Like This