Covid-19: Rwanda Extends Coronavirus Lockdown by Two Weeks

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The government in Rwanda has extended rigid lockdown restrictions imposed last month to 19 April.


The lockdown that begun on 21 March banned people from leaving their homes unless going out to shop for food or buy medicine.

The government deployed police to enforce the restrictions.

The lockdown was to end this weekend but was extended by the cabinet on Wednesday after the number of confirmed cases climbed from 17 to 82 in two weeks.

President Kagame on Wednesday chaired the virtual cabinet meeting, which extended the current two-week COVID-19 lockdown by 15 days.

“Farming will continue preparation for the ongoing agricultural season B while observing the guidelines from health authorities,” the communique, published late Wednesday, reads in part.

It adds: “Schools and higher education institutions (both public and private) will remain closed and are encouraged to use technology to continue instruction.”

Cabinet urged employees of both public and private institutions to continue using technology to work from home with the exception of those working in essential services.

During the extended lockdown, the borders will remain closed and only the entry of Rwandan citizens will be allowed.

Goods will continue to be allowed into the country.

Shops, schools and places of worship will remain closed and employees will continue working from home.



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Uzonna Anele
Anele is a web developer and a Pan-Africanist who believes bad leadership is the only thing keeping Africa from taking its rightful place in the modern world.

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