Constantly Taking Selfies Is A Subtle Sign Of Mental Illness, Study Finds

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We all have that friend who cannot seem to control the impulse to take selfies nor can they control the impulse to post a lot of those selfies online…

While there is absolutely nothing wrong in posting selfies online, those who over do it might actually have a psychological disorder according to a new study published in the
International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction .

Study

Two psychologists, Mark D. Griffiths and Janarthanan Balakrishnan, interviewed and observed the social media behavior of 225 college students at Indian universities to establish three levels of selfie addiction: borderline, acute, and chronic.

Findings

Those who take three selfies in a day but don’t post them on social media fall into the borderline category. Those who post at least three per day are considered acute, and those who have an “uncontrollable urge” to take selfies all the time and post at least six on social media per day are considered chronic.

The study authors, Griffiths and Balakrishnan suggest “selfitis” should possibly be considered another category of “technological addiction.” The term “selfitis” and the three levels of addiction were first laid out in a 2014 spoof article, which they used as a jumping off point.

They decided to survey students in India because the county has the most active Facebook users, and because India accounts for the highest number of selfie-related deaths.

Out of 127 selfie-related deaths that have been reported worldwide, 76 occurred in India.

The Researchers also surveyed 400 additional university students about their selfie habits and asked them to mark if they agreed or disagreed with statements such as, “I feel more popular when I post my selfies on social media,” and, “I feel confident when I take a selfie.”

They found that students who exhibited chronic selfie behavior were less confident and admitted to posting selfies because they felt they had to compete with others to get attention online.

The study is not without its limitations and readers should take the results with a grain of salt…



Uzonna Anele
Anele is a web developer and a Pan-Africanist who believes bad leadership is the only thing keeping Africa from taking its rightful place in the modern world.

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