Check Out The Works Of This Nigerian Hyper-realistic Charcoal Artist

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Her name is Chiamonwu Ifeyinwa Joy and she is a budding hyperrealistic artist from Nigeria. She utilizes this form of artwork to celebrate and portray Igbo culture and traditions. Looking at her work you would think you were staring at the image of an actual human being or object.

Chiamonwu Ifeyinwa Joy Nigerian Female Hyper-realistic Charcoal Artist
Image: Instagram

The very beautiful and highly talented charcoal and graphite artist, is not even upto 25, and yet she has managed to stun people with her drawings.

See her works below and confirm for yourself

View this post on Instagram

Title of Artwork: "Lost Page" The Third from my OLD TESTAMENT Series. Size: 106 × 121 cm Muse: My Mother (Mrs. Obianuju) Medium: Graphite and Charcoal on Paper. A HISTORICAL NARRATION AND IMPORTANCE OF BASKET WEAVING PORTRAYED IN THIS ARTWORK. Basket Weaving is an ancient skill or craft practiced among the Igbo speaking tribe in West Africa, West Africa as a whole and other African countries in general, which have survived to this day. It has developed to be a highly expressive contemporary art form. The shapes, sizes and weaves of these African baskets are largely determined by what the baskets are intended or designed for. This recent time, though the methods and processes of weaving baskets are still the same, but the materials used can either be from natural fibres such as raffia (African bamboo), sisal leaves, illala palms, tree barks, vines, canes and papyrus to man-made creations such as wires and plastics. Historically and traditionally, among the Igbo speaking tribe in Nigeria, West Africa and other African countries, the African baskets are used for Agricultural activities such as collecting and carrying of harvested crops, winnowing, and transporting of farm produce to the market. The baskets can be circular, conical, oval and rarely multi-chambered in appearance. It can also have an open bowl and can be used as a tray. In ancient times, Basket Weaving was a craft sorely meant for women but in this modern day, men are now involved in the craft of Basket Weaving. Due to the decreasing number of people practicing this craft as a result of modernism and technological inventions (it is from these reasons that the title of this artwork “Lost Page” was created), Basket Weaving is now extended or practiced for commercial purposes. Master weavers now weave baskets not only for agricultural or personal use, but also for the purpose of making money by selling these baskets to interested buyers like market women, tourists and art lovers.
These baskets are sometimes decorated with snail shells, beads and seeds. Kindly Share. Thank you❤ #africanartcollector #art @theshaderoom #ChiamonwuJoyArt @therealswizzz

A post shared by Chiamonwu Joy (@chiamonwu_joy) on

‘I’ve been drawing since I was 7-years-old. I discovered at elementary school that I was passionate about art.’

She only began drawing professionally, however, three years ago. That was when I realised how good I was at art.
‘For a big artwork, it takes me about one month to complete. For a medium or small canvas, it can take up to two or three weeks. I decide who and what to draw by how much I am moved and fascinated by the subject or object. How much it speaks to me on a personal, spiritual and creative level. All my artworks tell a story.’

Chiamonwu Ifeyinwa Joy is a graduate of English from Nnamdi Azikiwe University

Although she didn’t study art, she now draws professionally and showcases her impressive works, also selling to clients.



Uzonna Anele
Anele is a web developer and a Pan-Africanist who believes bad leadership is the only thing keeping Africa from taking its rightful place in the modern world.

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